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long lake library staff's Book Lists
eBooks (18 titles)
Download an eBook copy of these titles today! Learn more about eBooks by taking a class.
Winter Jackets (13 titles)
Tell us about an interesting book you would recommend to others. Enter to win a travel mug or gift card. Stop in and check out the Winter Jackets display at the Long Lake Library.
Bah-humbug! (19 titles)
Do you cringe at the sight of gift wrap and ribbon? Does your heart grow cold when you hear sleigh bells jingling? There is only one cure to this Grinch-like condition! Checkout some holiday humor and put a smile back on your face!
Minnesota Authors (22 titles)
Discover Minnesota's literary talent with these titles crafted by Minnesota authors.
Banned Books (27 titles)
Celebrate the freedom to read by checking out these sometimes censored titles. Banned Book Week is September 22nd - 28th!
Show all 14 booklists by long lake library staff

long lake library staff's Comments    
Cover ArtMindscape
by Vaughan, M. M.
Book Two of the Ability series. Now that the plot to destroy the prime minister is foiled, the students go back to their studies, both in academics and in use of their psychic abilities. They use their powers to aid law enforcement as special agents of the government. Chris is still dealing with the death he caused in the previous book. He keeps seeing the twin that got away and no one believes him. They think he is cracking up under the pressure. The plot meanders a bit here and there before coming to the final conclusion. It was still good, just not as good as the original.   posted Jul 12, 2014 at 4:43PM

Cover ArtQuest for lost heroes
by Gemmell, David.
This is my second favorite book. (see Centaur Isle above for the first)It starts out as a simple "rescue the damsel in distress" plot and picks up from there. A naive, young, and headstrong peasant enlists the aid of a legendary warrior, Chareos the Blademaster to help rescue a beautiful peasant girl from slavers. Before you know it, all four of the legendary "Heroes of Bel-azar" have joined in the foolish quest. It is a very realistic take on an old fantasy plot. The author takes on the subjects of fame, honor, love, and glory. There are laughs, shocks, and a twist or two that will keep you interested throughout the entire book. Many of the cultures will be similar to real cultures. (like the Mongols, the Chinese, and Western European) Not for children, I'm afraid. The "realism" comes from very some very mature attitudes and opinions (involving coarse language) as well as some mature situations and mature relationships. It is pretty gritty at times. But that is what makes it so good. All in all, it is one of the best fantasy novels I have ever read.   posted May 7, 2014 at 1:09PM

Cover ArtRedshirts
by Scalzi, John, 1969-
A cross between the plots of Galaxyquest and Stranger than Fiction, I was surprised by how good this book was. I was expecting the typical Star Trek-related jokes, especially as they related to the "redshirts" or extras on the original Star Trek series were called. These redshirts were the ones who went down to the alien planets with the stars of the show, only to invariably die in order to increase the dramatic tension of the show. It was a winning formula, based off the success of the show. But it begs the question, would the crew know of this dynamic and how would it affect them? This books answers that question. And a whole lot more, too. They couldn't use the real Star Trek universe, so they created a pretty obvious clone. If you are fans of Star Trek and other science fiction TV shows, you will enjoy this book. If you don't, most of the inside jokes will seem pretty weird to you. But I loved it. Teen and up. A little mature relationship and plenty of swearing.   posted Mar 19, 2014 at 11:09AM

Cover Art
by Grafton, Sue
I finally started this long time mystery series by Sue Grafton. A female private investigator, Kinsey Millhone, is hired to investigate a murder by the woman who was convicted of it. The plot was pretty straight-forward, with a few twists and turns, to keep you guessing. The main selling point is the main character. Like Evanovich's female bounty hunter, Grafton's Kinsey Millhone is a female in a typically male profession. Despite that, she is a pure 100% old school private eye, complete with bad relationships, a crummy apartment, and a very cynical attitude. Instead of a femme fatale, we have a man who plays that part in the story (a character of the opposite gender who radiates sex and danger, but might actually be involved in the case) In all respects, this is a modern version of a Sam Spade or a Phillip Marlowe as a woman. It was easy to read without a lot of mishmash to distract you. But the plot was also pretty simple to figure out before the murderer was revealed. So if you like private detective stories, you'll like this series. But if you like your mysteries to be harder to figure out, then it might not interest you. Overall, I give it a B-. Not for kiddies. Mature relationships and hardboiled situations. I did like it enough to give the next one in the series a try.   posted Mar 7, 2014 at 3:49PM

Cover ArtThe darkest minds
by Bracken, Alexandra
A friend recommended this to me and I am glad they did. It is right in my wheel-house, as they say. Set in a not-so-distant future, a whole generation of kids comes down with a deadly disease which kills over 70%. And if that wasn't devastating enough, the survivors develop strange abilities(super powers). The government, in order to protect the rest of the population, sticks all these kids in concentration/prison camps, to study and experiment on, but mostly just to isolate. There are five distinct groups of powers, all color-coded for easy identification. Blues are telekinetic, Yellows mentally control electricity, Greens are super intelligent, Reds can start fires with their minds, and the most dangerous of all are the Oranges, because they can control people with their telepathy. After a couple of "incidents", the Oranges and Reds are deemed too dangerous and need to be eliminated. Ruby is an Orange, pretending to be a Green. She is afraid of her powers and seeks only to blend in and survive. But as terrible as her new existence is, her life gets even harder and more complicated when an anti-government group breaks her out of camp. Can she trust them? Or do they just want to use her as a weapon? While not a fan of dystopias in general, Bracken really makes this situation seem very plausible. What would the government do if confronted with such a situation? How would that affect our economy and our society? Great teen book. Not for younger kids.   posted Jan 6, 2014 at 4:34PM

Show all 73 comments by long lake library staff

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