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Avatar for KaliO KaliO said:
Sherlock Holmes--wickedly intelligent, almost supernaturally observant, full of contempt for anyone else’s thought processes, a cocaine addict, and a beekeeper to boot-- is drama enough without adding a gawky fifteen-year-old orphan girl who’s every bit as sharp as the great detective himself. But that’s out heroine, Mary Russell, who runs full tilt into Holmes one sunny day in 1915 as she strolls through the fields with her nose in a book. They take an immediate liking to each other, finding in the other a kindred spirit with whom to match wits and intelligence. Russell becomes Holmes’ apprentice in the art of sleuthing and is a superb student; as the years pass and they solve minor crimes together, a deep friendship and close understanding grows between them. Their unique partnership is threatened, however, by a strange case during Russell’s college years at Oxford after World War I. A master criminal, as devious as the infamous Professor Moriarty, is playing a deadly game with Holmes and Russell’s very lives. How the unlikely duo crack the case is only slightly less intriguing than the evolving relationship between the master and his young partner. This is all accompanied by author Laurie R. King’s fine literary style, with Mary Russell as an intimately honest narrator, and a detailed sense of historical time and place. The other eight books in this series continue to develop both the Holmes mythology and the Mary Russell casebook with insightful adventures that draw on literature and history. The after-effects of World War I are investigated in the next two books, A Monstrous Regiment of Woman and A Letter of Mary, and in book six, Justice Hall. The scene of Holmes’ most famous case, The Hound of the Baskervilles, is revisited in The Moor (book three). Real-life crime writer Dashiel Hammet (best known for The Maltese Falcon) is a character in book eight, Locked Rooms, which is set in Prohibition-era San Francisco. Political intrigue and British espionage in the Middle East and India are explored in O Jerusalem and The Game (books five and seven), which also reference the “lost years” from the original Sherlock Holmes canon. And the most recent entry in the series, 2009’s The Language of Bees, resurrects the ghost of Holmes’ original brainy love interest, Irene Adler, to artfully combine past stories with the lively new life that Holmes and Russell lead in King’s intelligent, literary, and masterful mysteries. Novels of Suspense Featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes by Laurie R. King: 1. The Beekeeper’s Apprentice 2. A Monstrous Regiment of Women 3. A Letter of Mary 4. The Moor 5. O Jerusalem 6. Justice Hall 7. The Game 8. Locked Rooms 9. The Language of Bees 10. The God of the Hive (due 2010)
posted Feb 5, 2010 at 12:21AM
Avatar for KaliO KaliO said:
Sherlock Holmes is the original, ultimate bachelor-detective, complete with the genuine Dr. Watson to fawn over his masterly leaps of insight. But author Laurie R. King re-imagines Holmes in his later years as a beekeeper in the English countryside—until one day he trips over a gangly young girl with her nose in a book. The girl is orphan Mary Russell, and Sherlock has just met his match in wit and intelligence. First master and apprentice in the art of detection, then equal partners in investigation, Holmes and Russell’s relationship slowly grows into something more important and much more intimate. Their first real challenge comes during Russell’s college years at Oxford after World War I. A master criminal, as devious as the infamous Moriarty, is playing a deadly game with the pair’s very lives. This is all accompanied by King’s fine literary style, with Russell as an intimately honest narrator revealing a detailed sense of historical time and place. The other books in the series continue to develop both the Holmes mythology and the Mary Russell casebook with insightful adventures that draw on literature and history—and just a bit of romance.
posted Feb 15, 2011 at 7:42AM
Avatar for poohbubba poohbubba said:
When you think Sherlock Holmes, you think of Dr. James Watson, his trusted sidekick. Well in this series we are introduced to a new, and would say better aide.
posted Sep 22, 2011 at 3:05PM
Avatar for A.E.C.M. A.E.C.M. said:
This book is so much fun to read, even if it is a bit disorganized. I enjoy it immensely, the characters are fun and well thought of, and I am a great fan of Sherlock Holmes.
posted Oct 21, 2011 at 12:22PM
Avatar for Beth B. Beth B. said:
For fans of the original Sherlock Holmes series. These books introduce a new sidekick to a "retired" Holmes, an equally brilliant young girl. The book starts off a little slow and isn’t quite as good as Conan Doyle but will draw you in to an intriguing mystery.
posted Mar 3, 2012 at 10:55AM
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main characters Mary Russell
Female
Age: 15
Orphan
Recently orphaned after her parents and younger brother died in a automobile accident which she survived; heir to a sizable estate; lives with her aunt; studying at Oxford; Sherlock Holmes becomes her mentor in the art of private investigating.
Scholar

Sherlock Holmes
Male
Age: 54
Retired
Raising bees during retirement; teaching Mary the art of deduction; tracking down a kidnapped American senator's daughter; confronts a bomber determined to stop Holmes.
Private investigator



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